Parents: We need to get a grip on our own college application anxiety

“…it’s hard to think about all the other intangibles, those pieces of your child’s intellect – of your child’s heart – that are random, unquantifiable, ungraph-able. The pieces that emerge in fits and starts, the quick passions so quickly abandoned, the restless curiosity chased by bland inertia. All the spiky, tangled bits that can’t be groomed, that simply can’t be curated, to please an admissions officer down the road.”

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Read more of Laura Fitzgerald Cooper’s article on Washington Post’s On Parenting.

In Preparation for Student’s Future, Parents are Primary Force

Prior to coming to DISES, I taught at the vocational school in Ellsworth. One of the goals of that school was preparing high school students for the work force, military service or a post secondary education, including vocational training or college. After many years in education and the private sector, my thinking has evolved into the belief that we must start earlier than the high school level in prepping children for their post secondary lives. While I do not think we should start sorting students into specific careers, we can do many things to prepare them for a career or further education. 

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Students at the middle level should have knowledge of the wide variety of options for their future, both work and education. Students should already be practicing a good work ethic, including coming to school on time, completing tasks in a timely manner, or how to collaborate and cooperate. They should learn that their current actions can follow them for the rest of their lives. Currently being done at the middle level, they should also learn about healthy and safe choices in social media, personal health, and social settings. Parents are the greatest influence in their child’s life and should talk to their children about all of these issues, the sooner the better. Schools can be partners in this process, but parents are the primary force.

– Michael Benjamin, Parent and DISES Principal

What to Share (and Not Share) About Your Kids Online

Where do you stand? Do you share pictures and other personal information about your kids online?

“…as far as social media goes do as you will. I respect people on both ends of the spectrum and everywhere in between. I just think it’s important to really take a moment to think about where you stand every now and then—to be sure you’re being true to your family values.” 

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Whether you share pics of your kids or not, read more from Amy Heinz at Using Our Words.

Parent Action Plan, Part 4: 11th Grade

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“Junior year usually marks a turning point. This is because for most students and families, it’s when college planning activities kick into high gear. Here are some things you can do this year to support your child and give him or her the best options.”

Moving right along, here is Part 4 of the Part Action Plan as suggested by College Board’s BigFuture.